The Beauty of Mexico

Colleen Macomber, our Mexico Program Director, reflects on the joys of teaching there

 
Celebrate the Beat Students Walk From School To The Plaza For Rehearsal In Mexico

Celebrate the Beat Students Walk From School To The Plaza For Rehearsal In Mexico

 

Dust blows over the basketball court where we teach. Gas trucks play songs as they pass by. Sometimes the roosters crow louder than I can count to the dancers.  The live music must excite them. It is not uncommon for our furry little friends to join classes. They often follow their owners to school.

There are more celebrations down here in México than in New Orleans, where I grew up. We have kid’s day, teacher’s day, fisherman’s day, flag day, revolution day, and day of the dead. Each town has their own festival and each school has their own day to celebrating their name.

We have school competitions of all sorts. We have a fútbol, flag saluting, singing the national anthem, and even cleaning-up-the-school competitions. We have tourists who peek through the gates to see the live music. My favorite is when people in neighboring houses tell me that they wake up each morning we teach to the children counting. 5-6-7-8.

Needless to say, teaching in México is raw, exciting, and unpredictable. It has taught me tremendous life lessons and how to go with the flow. The Pacific Ocean is a constant reminder of that. The students have nicknamed me Maestra Brincolin (Spanish for trampoline). To hear my name as I walk down local streets is a welcomed sound. The children here are loving, funny, caring, and have brought out the best in me.

Humor is the best form of expression and laughter is the best medicine. Teaching excellence is the key ingredient to our program’s success and the children expect that with Celebrando el Ritmo. ¡Dale con ganas, alegría, fuerza y confianza!

An Aspirational Future

In a month, five of us (three board members and Dan and I) are gathering to partake in the first of what we hope will be many inspired and inspiring visioning sessions.  Because everyone’s voices are crucial to the long-term success of CTB, engaging our stakeholders in our deep dive into big picture thinking is vitally important. I am extremely grateful to have time and space for all of us to contribute our hopes, dreams, fears - anything and everything. So, we first answer WHY we are compelled to nurture CTB, which will then lead us to answering HOW we will do so.  The strategic plan and practical issues of discussing events, funding, etc, will happen after we’ve been given this room for creativity, sharing and dreaming.  The essential process is about marrying imagination and strategy – taking intuitive, creative and informed leaps into a possible, aspirational future.

At the suggestion of Horst Abraham, a brilliant business advisor who led my seminar at National Arts Strategies, I’m asking each of us to prepare for our meeting by writing two newspaper articles with headlines: One reporting becoming wildly successful in the pursuit of our ‘Everest Goal’ with short news clips to embellish and add detail to the imagined success story. The other, a failure story, again creating headlines that spell out why CTB failed. Prompts for writing include questions like: What are you most proud of? What are our top 1-3 major accomplishments or “big wins”?  What difference did this make in the world? In the past X years, what is the most significant breakthrough that launched the organization into a whole new level of wild success? How? What happened? Who helped make it happen? What was different?

The purpose of this exercise is to help each of us articulate our own personal WHY which will in turn lead us all toward determining the HOW.  And when we are clear on the why and how, we can happily move into creating our strategic plan.